©
woodendreams:

Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, Germany (by Kilian Schönberger)

woodendreams:

Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, Germany (by Kilian Schönberger)



huffposttaste:

Men guzzle, women sip.

huffposttaste:

Men guzzle, women sip.



huffingtonpost:

Inseparable Dog Besties Who Were Rescued Together Are The True Meaning Of Friendship

When Annie Hart got out of her car in East Los Angeles earlier this month, she was expecting to find two white-furred, abandoned dogs who had been wandering around the streets together for weeks. What she didn’t expect, however, was to find a canine couple whose friendship would astound and inspire her.

For an exclusive interview with rescuer Annie Hart and how to help and adopt these two pups go here.



aphrodisy:

what is this

aphrodisy:

what is this



trekghost:

Can we talk about the time that instead of injecting it through the cloth or rolling up his sleeve Bones just straight up rips Kirk’s shirt to give him medicine



biruskis:

If the Winter Soldier was responsible for the Kennedy assassination and Magneto tried to STOP the Kennedy assassination then that must mean somehow Magneto lost a fight to a guy wITH AN ENTirE ARm MADE OF METAL



man-and-camera:

Hey! So I’ve received a bunch of questions asking how I take my star photos, so I’ve decided to make a post about it.
Basically to get the stars to be vibrant and not washed out, as well as the Milky Way to stand out brightly, you need several factors. Firstly, gear is actually very important in night photography.
As for gear, a good DSLR body, one which is capable of a high ISO without noise is vital. I shoot on 2500-3200 ISO. As for a lens, one which can go super wide, both in focal and in f/stop is just as important. I use a Canon L 20-35mm f/2.8, shot at 25 seconds on f/2.8 at 20mm focal.
When setting up your shot, you want to use the rule of 500. This is basically a simple rule to stop your stars being blurry due to the Earths rotation. Simply divide 500/your focal length. For example, since I shoot at 20mm, I do 500/20 = 25 seconds.
To get your shot in focus, you have two options. One, use your liveview and zoom in 10X on the brightest star you can find. Turn your focus to manual, and fiddle with it till the star is sharp. You’d think it’d be full back, but its not on most lens. Generally infinity is slightly back from full turn. Your other option is to crank the ISO to its highest settings, and take a photo, readjust the focus, and repeat till it’s right.
When planning a photo, location is crucial. I use cleardarksky.com to check weather, cloud clover and astronomical viewing for that night at that specific location. As well, I use the Dark Sky app on my iPhone to see the extent of light pollution surrounding the area I am. Pointing your lens in a direction of a big town, even if its 50+km away will affect your shot.
Finally, know which part of the night sky you’re shooting. For British Columbia during most of the summer, the Milkyway rises due south at approx. 11pm for an average estimate. It varies, but for most purposes that’s all I plan my shot on.  

Hope this helps!

man-and-camera:

Hey! So I’ve received a bunch of questions asking how I take my star photos, so I’ve decided to make a post about it.

Basically to get the stars to be vibrant and not washed out, as well as the Milky Way to stand out brightly, you need several factors. Firstly, gear is actually very important in night photography.

As for gear, a good DSLR body, one which is capable of a high ISO without noise is vital. I shoot on 2500-3200 ISO. As for a lens, one which can go super wide, both in focal and in f/stop is just as important. I use a Canon L 20-35mm f/2.8, shot at 25 seconds on f/2.8 at 20mm focal.

When setting up your shot, you want to use the rule of 500. This is basically a simple rule to stop your stars being blurry due to the Earths rotation. Simply divide 500/your focal length. For example, since I shoot at 20mm, I do 500/20 = 25 seconds.

To get your shot in focus, you have two options. One, use your liveview and zoom in 10X on the brightest star you can find. Turn your focus to manual, and fiddle with it till the star is sharp. You’d think it’d be full back, but its not on most lens. Generally infinity is slightly back from full turn. Your other option is to crank the ISO to its highest settings, and take a photo, readjust the focus, and repeat till it’s right.

When planning a photo, location is crucial. I use cleardarksky.com to check weather, cloud clover and astronomical viewing for that night at that specific location. As well, I use the Dark Sky app on my iPhone to see the extent of light pollution surrounding the area I am. Pointing your lens in a direction of a big town, even if its 50+km away will affect your shot.

Finally, know which part of the night sky you’re shooting. For British Columbia during most of the summer, the Milkyway rises due south at approx. 11pm for an average estimate. It varies, but for most purposes that’s all I plan my shot on.  

Hope this helps!




Danett Yoo holds two packages of cigarettes and a bicycle in front of her parents store-Yoo’s Deli and Variety on King St. E on Wednesday November 20, 2013. A man attempted to steal two packages of cigarettes, but she chased him down the street and after a struggle she took his bike and still has it. Veronica Henri/Toronto Sun/QMI Agency

Danett Yoo holds two packages of cigarettes and a bicycle in front of her parents store-Yoo’s Deli and Variety on King St. E on Wednesday November 20, 2013. A man attempted to steal two packages of cigarettes, but she chased him down the street and after a struggle she took his bike and still has it. Veronica Henri/Toronto Sun/QMI Agency



bloombergphotos:

New Era of Civil Disobedience                              

Anti-government activists gather during a protest in Hong Kong, China, late Saturday and in the early morning hours of Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014. 

Pro-democracy protesters kick-started an occupation of central Hong Kong after students clashed with the city’s police, prompting thousands of people to take to the streets in support. 

China said last month that candidates for the 2017 leadership election must be vetted by a committee, angering pro-democracy campaigners who say the group is packed with business executives and lawmakers who favor Beijing. 

Read more from the report by Bloomberg News

Photographer: Lam Yik Fei/Bloomberg     

© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP



neeneegoose:

#free_69min: ghibli! i worked really hard on these puns okay

neeneegoose:

#free_69min: ghibli! i worked really hard on these puns okay



starrysleeper:

high-blogging:


while my prof was setting up for his lecture… 

gold

excuse me while I reblog this for the 36th time

starrysleeper:

high-blogging:

while my prof was setting up for his lecture… 

gold

excuse me while I reblog this for the 36th time